Christmas Pudding

As I confessed in my recent Christmas Cake post here I don’t always do a homemade Christmas pudding.  After writing that, it struck me that this was really very lazy of me.  “Call yourself a cook?” I asked myself, and resolved there and then to make one this year and every year.  Honestly, it’s so incredibly easy and quick to make and doesn’t involve sophisticated baking skills.

The first thing you need to do is find a recipe.  I’m not going to give you one here because you probably all have at least one.  And if you don’t, there’s the Internet, which is where I found mine: it’s this one by Bertinet’s in Bath.  I hadn’t made it before this year but had bought Bertinet’s puddings in the past which had gone down very well, so I’m confident this one will be delicious.  I’ve also made Delia’s pudding (pretty sure you’ll find it online if you haven’t got her wonderful, and in my case much used, Christmas book) and one by the great Nigel Slater.  My preference will always be not to mess about with the recipe and to stick to traditional ingredients, but if you fancy trying something a bit different, there are plenty of suggestions out there.  For me, part of the beauty of preparing the Christmas meal is that it is the same (more or less) every year.  With all that’s going on at that time of year, and the many tasks that need to be done, it takes the pressure off if you are not having to think up a new, imaginative menu on top of everything else.

So back to my pudding.   You will see from the photos that I could not fit all my mixture in the recommended 2 pint size basin and ended up with an additional small pudding; I intend to give this as a gift to the hostess of a party we’ve been invited to.  Before putting the puddings in the fridge for some hours (as recommended by Mr Bertinet) I placed a circle of greaseproof paper on top of each one.

As for the steaming, it really couldn’t be easier than in the Aga.  Cover both puddings in clingfilm and then take a saucepan which holds the pudding basin and make sure you can fit the lid on.  Place the pudding in it and pour in water about half way up the basin.  Bring this to the boil on the boiling plate and then simmer on the simmering plate for 30 minutes.  Check the water level, put the lid on and place in the simmering oven to “steam” for 12 hours or overnight.  I left mine (both of them) while I slept on Sunday night and we came downstairs on Monday morning to a heavenly Christmas-y aroma.

Leave the pudding to cool in its clingfilm.  I then wrapped mine in muslin and tied it with string as you can see in the photo above.  Foil or extra clingfilm would be fine; I just think it looks pretty (and traditional) in the muslin.

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One thought on “Christmas Pudding

  1. Pingback: Christmas Pudding | MsCellany

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